Photo by Elaine Casap on Unsplash

Why Good Food Is Glue For Communities, and Two Organizations Fighting the Good Food Fight.

Adam French

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A story of two organizations who are across the world from each other, but still understand how communities are brought together and empowered — with food.

Good Food Is Community Glue

Before I talk about how local food culture can be the glue to a community, let’s take a second to define “Good Food”. This is one definition of many, but I think it makes the most sense in a societal and community-health context.

Characteristics of Good Food

In the context of this article, good food is…

Note: Every bullet point links to a study or article that explains why it’s “good”. So if you don’t agree with me, read the attached links before arguing in the comments 😉

How Good Food Brings Together Communities

So how does good food bring together communities? It’s actually a simple positive feedback loop.

When people eat nutrient dense food, they feel better (90% of seratonin, the happy hormone, is located in the gut). Locally produced food tends to be much more nutrient dense and minimally processed.

When you buy whole foods, you need to cook them, and cooking acts as a great opportunity to socialize with the people you’re close to when compared to the alternatives. Michael Pollan explains it well:

We forget how much time it can take simply to avoid cooking: all that time spent driving to restaurants or waiting for our orders, none of which gets counted as ‘food preparation’. And much of the half-hour saved by not cooking is spent watching screens.

So all of these characteristics of good food build on one another, and ultimately culminate in people eating together more. Another way good food brings together communities is through the buying process.

If you’re buying food that’s locally produced, you’re likely buying it through a produce share, farmers market, or local…

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Adam French

Regenerative Design + Entrepreneurship + Personal Development & Spirituality. Want to jam? Hit me up adam@interform.space